Learning Medicine

We visit five places on campus where future doctors are learning how to practice medicine. We’re going to real classrooms: anatomy lab and wet lab, lecture halls, we visit a Stanford Free Clinic, bike across campus to the mausoleum, and head down the road to Webb Ranch. We’re asking: How are students learning to practice medicine, thoughtfully?

Story 1: Suicide Prevention at the Mausoleum
Sometimes, a word can help identify exactly what’s missing. Urban dictionary says: to be “stoked” is to be completely and intensely enthusiastic, exhilarated, or excited about something. Those who are stoked all of the time know this; being stoked is the epitome of all being. In our next story, State of the Human Producer JJ Kapur learns the healing power of getting stoked.

Producers: JJ Kapur and Esha Dhawan
Music: Thunderstorm (Pon VIII) by Kai Engel; Slimheart by Blue Dot Sessions; Ghost Surf Rock by Loyalty Freak Music; The graveyard by Loyalty Freak Music; Blue Highway by Podington Bear; Our Only Lark by Blue Dot Sessions; You Don’t Surf So Shut Up by Waylon Thornton and the Heavy Hands

Story 2: Warlock Genetics
For many doctors, it takes four years to complete their degree. But physician-scientists — doctors who have an MD and a PhD — have eight years of school. These physician-scientists treat patients and conduct cutting-edge medical research. Our producer tries to figure out if learning medicine and learning how to conduct medical research is the path for her. To make things more complicated, Victoria grew up in an Eastern Medicine household, so pursuing an MD in the Western tradition is already lifting a few eyebrows.

Producers: Victoria Yuan and Sarah Griffin
Music: Never Forget by Ketsa; Multiverse by Ketsa; Tian Mi Mi by Teresa Teng; Syaba by Aoiroooasamusi; Slow Vibing by Ketsa; Robot Waltz by Ketsa

Story 3: Spiritual Cowgirl
In our next story, State of the Human Producer Aparna Verma visits Dr. Beverly Kane at Webb Ranch to observe Equine-imity. Formally a practicing doctor at Apple, and a family practice physician, Dr. Kane now teaches these courses at the Stanford School of Medicine. She also teaches another class called Medicine & Horsemanship, which trains medical students and practitioners to develop an awareness of the subtleties of communication that are necessary for a provider-patient relationship.

Producers: Aparna Verma and Linda Liu
Music: Loco Lobo, Sergey Cheremisinov, Kai Engel

Story 4: Anatomical Mnemonics
Mnemonics use information already stored in long-term memory to make memorization easier. Maybe you also learned PEMDAS for order of math operations. parentheses, exponent, multiplication, division, addition, and subtraction. In no field perhaps, are mnemonics more abundant than in medicine. For our next story, pre-med student, producer Victoria Yuan visits Anatomy Lab after hours to ask if learning mnemonics affects the way medical students think about people.

Producer: Victoria Yuan
Music: Kitty in the Window by Podington Bear; Awakenings by Ketsa; Dog Politics by Elvis Herod; Pictures of the Floating by Canada; Orange Sunshine by Rod Hamilton; Tinny Whistle by Elvis Herod