Immigrating Release Party

Wednesday, Nov. 29 
6pm
Hume Center Lounge

Undergrads, join us for the release party of State of the Human‘s latest episode: “Immigrating,” which will be released in two parts. We’ll listen to “Episode 1 — Crossings” and “Episode 2 — Conversations” and there will food and friends, in addition to great storytelling.


National Novel Writing Month

To all the National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) writers out there! The Stanford Storytelling Project has teamed up with Stanford’s Green Library to create a special table devoted to YOU.

If you need a place to go this month and get that daily word count done, somewhere with quiet camaraderie, where you can sit and grind, where you can get words of inspiration, pep talks, and the chance to get cool, secret treats and be just footsteps away from Coupa coffee, then come to the first floor of Green Library at any time during the library’s open hours and follow the signs to our little NaNoWriMo haven.

At the table you will find binders chock full of inspiring quotes, tips, great passages, exercises, and, most of all, advice on getting back to your writing. 😉 You can sign up in the binders to get emails about periodic treats throughout the month, and you can leave your own sage advice and inspiring words for others.


Sticky Stories

d.school Seminar
Instructors: Jonah Willihnganz, Erik Olesund, Emi Kolawole

For designers, the creative process is bookended by stories—we start with the story our users tell and we finish with the story that our product, solution, or service tells. Good designers therefore need to be very good story-listeners and story-tellers. This short course will help students develop the core skills to become both by applying what linguists, psychologists, narratologists, and neuroscientists have learned about how exactly stories generate meaning that sticks.

This class is a deep dive in interviewing, synthesis and storytelling. Students who apply should have a strong familiarity with the design thinking process, a commitment to develop their empathetic capacity, and a curiosity about how the mind makes meaning.

By application only. Undergraduates and graduate students encouraged to apply. Apply here with the d.school Pop-Up common application.


Oh My Sweet Land

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
2 pm
Branner Hall Dining Room
Attendance is free to the Stanford community, but RSVP through Eventbrite is required.

Theatre by Amir Nizar Zuabi
directed by Torange Yeghiazarian
featuring Nora el Samahy

A woman of Syrian-German heritage recalls her encounter with Ashraf, a Syrian man in Paris, while preparing the Syrian delicacy kibbeh. When he disappears, she goes on a long journey in search of him that leads to stirring conversations with some of the two-million Syrian refugees in Lebanon and Jordan. One part detective story, one part a woman’s reckoning with her heritage, Oh My Sweet Land complicates our understanding of the conflict in Syria and highlights the resilience of the Syrian people.

Organized by The Markaz: Resource Center with support from the Haas Center for Public Service, the Institute for Diversity in the Arts, the Stanford Storytelling Project, the Office of VPUE, and the WSD HANDA Center for Human Rights & International Justice.


Alice Walker – Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart: Noticing Where You Are, and Who or What Is There With You

Alice Walker

Wednesday, November 8, 2017
7:00 pm
Memorial Church (Simulcast at Cubberley)
The event in Memorial Church is sold out, but you can reserve a free ticket for the simulcast here.

“No one escapes a time in life when the arrow of sorrow, of anger, of despair pierces the heart.For many of us, there is the inevitable need to circle the wound.It is often such a surprise to find it there, in us, when we had assumed arrows so painful only landed in the hearts of other people.Some of us spend decades screaming at the archer.Or at least for longer periods than are good for us.How to take the arrow out of the heart?How to learn to relieve our own pain?That is the question.Like many such questions it is one delved into by Buddhism, but also by anyone who has lived long enough to see, by trial and error, for the most part, that the futility we begin to feel, as we attempt to bring down the archer, leaves our wounded heart untended and the medicine of life that abounds wherever we are, is left unapplied.”—Alice Walker

Alice Walker is an internationally celebrated writer, poet and activist whose books include seven novels, four collections of short stories, four children’s books, and volumes of essays and poetry.She won the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction in 1983 and the National BookAward for her novel The Color Purple. Her work has been translated into more than two dozen languages, and her books have sold more than fifteen million copies. Walker has been an activist all of her adult life, and believes that learning to extend the range of our compassion is activity and work available to all. She has a deep meditation practice. She is a staunch defender not only of human rights, but of the rights of all living beings. She is one of the world’s most prolific writers, yet continues to travel the world to literally stand on the side of the poor, and the economically, spiritually and politically oppressed. She also stands, on the side of the revolutionaries, teachers and leaders who seek change and transformation of the world.

This event is part of the Contemplation by Design Summit and is co-sponsored by the Office for Religious Life, the Stanford Storytelling Project, the Health Improvement Project, and BeWell.


First Open Meeting, Fall 2017

First Open Meeting Oct. 3, 5:30pm, Hume Center

Be sure to save the date and come to our first Stanford Storytelling Project open meeting of the term!

Join friends, make new ones, bring new people, your whole dorm!, eat yummy food, and learn all about the fun things in store for the term and the year!

A preview of upcoming podcast themes: Immigrating, Caretaking, Timing, Mirroring, Broadcasting, Myth, Naming … just to name a few.

Here’s our most recent episode for inspiration.

Spread the word! Tell your friends to tell their friends, and so on, and so on …


Crashing

Sometimes, marching steadily through the steps of life—we crash right into something entirely unexpected. In one instant, the entire world changes, without even a word of warning. When a crash comes, that collision can destroy everything. But it can wake us up to what we truly need; we must decide what to raze and what to rebuild. How do humans move forward before the smoke is cleared? What happens after the crash?

Host: Eileen Williams
Producers: Eileen Williams, Claudia Heymach, Jackson Roach, Megan Calfas, Alex Cheng, Noelle Li Syn Chow, Jake Warga
Featuring: Eddie Mazon, Michael Peskin, Miles Traer, Dr. David Radler, Dan Klein, Dehan Glanz
Show music: “Darger’s strawberry” by Exteenager, “opening credits” by Johnny Ripper
Release date: 31 May 2017


Story 1: SLACing off

Dr. Michael Peskin works in the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, home of the world’s longest linear accelerator. At SLAC, researchers crash X rays and particles, and a huge variety of things together, but not for destruction or for fun—but for learning.

Producer: Claudia Heymach
Featuring: Michael Peskin
Music: Original viola by Rosie LaPuma

Image via SLAC

Story 2: Myth and Science

Miles accidentally crashed the Stanford server, but as an earth scientist there’s a lot more at risk. Myth and science have been separated in the real world, but in fantasy and fiction they dance together to tell stories.

Producer: Eileen Williams
Featuring: Miles Traer
Music: Soundtrack to “Game of Thrones”

Image via Wikimedia Commons

Story 3: Crash Cart

Dr. David Radler is a senior resident in the department of emergency medicine at Stanford University. He tells us about one particularly memorable crash, and what it taught him.

Producer: Eileen Williams
Featuring: Dr. David Radler
Music: Kai Engel

Image via Openclipart

Story 4: Car Crash

In an instant, everything can change. When Dan and Danno got in a car crash in their sophomore year at Stanford, everything did. Now they’re both back at Stanford as professors and recount the event that shook and shaped their lives (and even inspired a Lifetime Movie). Their perspective is one you might not expect in light of the tragedy that unhinged their world. Dan says today, “That’s a great approach to life—to assume that there’s something lucky to every unlucky thing that happens.”

Producers: Megan Calfas and Alex Cheng
Featuring: Dan Klein and Dehan Glanz
Music and sound: Kai Engel, David Szesztay, Podington Bear, De la Soul, The Clientele, “A Mother’s Fight for Justice”

Image via Flickr


Navigating

Ants navigate to and from food using pheromone trails; the stronger the pheromone trail, the more ants following it, like some kind of highway map. Humans use similar mapping strategies as we navigate through life, but how do we know that the paths we’re on will lead us to where we want to be? Today’s show is about navigating, with four stories and a poem about various ways that humans are moving through the world, with unique answers to these questions: How do we navigate through life without any instructions, or with instructions that might be wrong? How do we know which way to go to get whatever we’re going for? And how do we decide when to stop moving?

Host: Connie Xiao
Producers: Will Rogers, Alec Glassford, Rosie La Puma, Yue Li, Cathy Wong, Virginia Drummond, Katie Wolfteich, Aparna Verma, Jenny Han, An-Li Herring, and Connie Xiao
Featuring: Chris Leboa, Deborah Gordon, Julie Sweetkind-Singer, Glen McLaughlin, Saptarshi Majumdar, Jennifer Johnson, and Louis Lafair
Show Music: Noelle Li Syn Chow, Melina Walling, Sarah Jiang, Gillicuddy, Doctor Turtle, Podington Bear, Polyrhythmics

Image via Flickr

Release date: 17 May 2017


Story 1: California as an Island

When the Spanish explorers set out to discover the Americas, they came to find wealth and a new start. In this story, we hear about how the Spanish explorers navigated through these unfamiliar territory and how a myth turned into a reality that passed around for centuries.

Producers: Yue Li, Virginia Drummond
Featuring: Glen McLaughlin, Julie Sweetkind-Singer
Special thanks: G. Salim Mohammed, of the David Rumsey Map Center at Stanford
Music and sound: Original music by Latifah Hamzah, “Rain Stops to Play” by Ketsa, “mutanterrante remix” by toiletrolltube, additional sounds from freesound.org

Image via Wikimedia

Navigating – Story 2: In Transit

“Once you decide something, you kinda have to destroy everything else right? Your other options? You gotta let em go.” We spend an entire day at the Oakland Greyhound station and ask people where they are going. Mark Mendoza chases a cameraman. Cathy Wong learns when not to own a skeleton key. Hollie Kool talks to a Japanese pizza lover. Mimes are involved.

Producer: Cathy Wong, Hollie Kool, and Mark Mendoza
Featuring: Cathy Wong, Hollie Kool, and Mark Mendoza
Music: “Night Owl” by Broke For Free, “Freak Mode” by Fleslit, “Dollar Theatre” by Jalen Warshawsky, “Unknown Variables” by Jalen Warshawsky, “El Fuego” by Polyrhythmics, “Cold Feet” and “I’ll Miss You” and “Looking For That Moment When Time Stands Still” by Will Bangs

Image via Flickr

Navigating – Story 3: It’s not a Sap Story

Live the life of a savage adventurer. It’s a motto that Saptarshi Majumdar lives by as he travels across the globe, whether it’s from one continent to another or one coast to another. Sap’s journeys are wild and crazy, and the stories that he picks up even crazier. Why not sit back and enjoy the ride?

Producers: Aparna Verma and Jenny Han
Featuring: Saptarshi Majumdar and Aparna Verma
Music: “Hex (Instrumental)” by Forget the Whale, “We’ll Get Ourselves in TV-News” by Break the Bans

Image via Saptarshi Majumdar

Navigating – Story 4: A Speck in the Ocean

When she was 25, Jennifer Johnson sailed out of a Japanese harbor on a 27-foot boat with sights set on Hawaii. Sit in the cockpit with her as she charts her way through storms, fish colonies, and nearly capsized boats with only her partner for company, and re-experience the newness and stillness of land. “Adventure? Oh, I don’t know, adventure has too many positive connotations to say it was an adventure.”

Producers: Katie Wolfteich
Featuring: Jennifer Johnson
Music: Weaves of K

Image via Flickr

Navigating – Story 5: If There Were a Manual

“May I please have a manual for life?” Louis Lafair reads an original poem.

Producer: Alec Glassford
Featuring: Louis Lafair

Image via Flickr

 


StoryNight

StoryNight

June 6, 2017
7pm and 9pm
Elliott Program Center
Free and open to the public

Join us for an unforgettable evening of live storytelling! Students will perform stories they’ve developed throughout the quarter in the course StoryCraft, taught by TAPS faculty and improv guru Dan Klein and director Michelle Darby.

StoryNight is free and open to the public. Come early: hot chocolate and chai will be served before the performance!

There are two showtimes: 7pm and 9pm (each one hour long). They will feature different student stories, so come to both if you can!