Breathing

Breath and spirit have been closely related in human thought—for millennia. In a lot of human languages, we use the same word to mean both things. Yet it’s easy to take breathing for granted, in spite of the fact it is maybe the most common human experience. In this episode, we’re going to think about every inhale and every exhale, and speak to people who have to think about breathing in a lot of interesting ways: a biathlete, a beatboxer, a dancer. We’ll dive deep underwater to a dark and dangerous cave in the Bahamas, travel to China to think about collective breathing, and reflect on the role artificial breathing plays in the perception of what constitutes life and what constitutes death.

 

Host: Jackson Roach
Producers: Kate Nelson, Carissa Cirelli, Jenny March, Jake Warga, Jackson Roach, Melina Walling, Katie Lan, Jett Hayward, Claudia Heymach, Netta Wang, Jonah Willihnganz
Featuring: Brad Ross, Joanne Reid, Tom Johnson, Jace Casey, Janice Ross, Andrew Todhunter, Paul Fisher
Show Music: johnny_ripper

Image via Flickr

Release Date: 3 May 2017


 

Intro Story: Beat Breathing

Brad Ross started his beatboxing career as a senior in high school, “as kind of a joke.” Now you can spot Brad dropping a beat in the acapella group, Stanford Mixed Company, or just ask him for a demo like we did. Brad shares how he learned how to harness the rhythm behind the rhythm—the rhythm of the breath—and what he’s discovered from “using [his] lungs to make art.”

Producers: Kate Nelson, Carissa Cirelli, Jenny March, Jake Warga
Featuring: Brad Ross
Music: Brad’s sick beats

Image courtesy of Brad Ross

 

Story 1: Shot Breathe Shot Breathe Shot Breathe

Could you transition from the flurry of a race to the calm of absolute still in a few seconds? In biathlon, a sport that combines cross-country skiing and rifle marksmanship, this skill is a must. After much trial and tribulation and many failed shots, Joanne Reid, biathlete of the U.S national team, learned that it’s all about the breath. Be warned, this story is not for the faint of lungs.

Producers: Kate Nelson, Carissa Cirelli, Jenny March, Jake Warga
Featuring: Joanne Reid
Music and Sound: “Epiphany” by Podington Bear, “Women 15 km Individual Race 2017 Biathlon IBU World Championships in Hochfilzen HD” by HQ Sport

Image via Flickr

 

Story 2: Running out of Breath

This is a recorded performance about breath, exhaustion, and struggle, written by a choreographer named Tom Johnson in the 1970s. With reflections from Dr. Janice Ross, professor of dance. “The body is a leaky, messy medium for art making.”

Writer: Tom Johnson
Producers: Jackson Roach and Jenny March
Featuring: Jace Casey, Janice Ross

Image via Wikimedia

 

Story 3: Stargate

Andrew Todhunter, a writer for National Geographic, explores the underwater cave of Stargate in the Bahamas. It’s dark, dangerous, and “as alien as any possible science fiction world.” But while exploring the perilous surroundings around him, Todhunter reveals a surprising truth—one that comes from within.

Producers: Jackson Roach, Melina Walling
Featuring: Andrew Todhunter
Music and sound: “Oceans Between Us” by Maritime, “Falling” by Kamikaze Deadboy, “waiting (in the wet alley” by lost-radio, “Moon Morning” by Aymeric de Tapol, “A Million Worlds” by Andrew Odd, additional sound effects from Freesound.org and Archive.org

Image via Flickr

 

Story 4: Breathing to Resist

After Mao Zedong’s death in 1976, China was catapulted into an era of great change. At the same time, masses of people began practicing qigong, a healing breathing practice. Qigong became so popular that public spaces would be filled with practitioners breathing together. Nancy Chen, a professor of medical anthropology at UC Santa Cruz, tells us more about the “qigong fever” in China during the 1980s and 1990s and the government’s reaction to the fever.

Writers: Katie Lan and Jenny March
Producers: Katie Lan, Jenny March, Jake Warga, and Jackson Roach
Featuring: Nancy Chen

Image via Wikimedia

 

Story 5: Still Breathing

When 13-year-old Jahi McMath suffered complications during a tonsillectomy that resulted in her being declared brain dead, Doctor Paul Fisher served as a court-appointed official tasked with administering an exam to confirm Jahi’s brain death. Despite confirmation that Jahi suffered from irreversible brain death, Jahi’s family decided to keep her on life support. Dr. Fisher reflects on the role that breathing plays in the perception what constitutes life and death.

Producers: Jett Hayward, Kate Nelson, and Jenny March
Featuring: Paul Fisher
Music: “Stay” by Igor Khabarov, “Three kites circling” by Axletree, “Dead Waters” by Rest You Sleeping Giant, “Harbor” by Kai Engel, “Stanford Doctor to Examine Jahi McMath” by KRON 4, “Hospital Ventilator Sound Effect | Sfx |HD” by n Beats Sound Effects

Image via Public Domain Pictures


To Sleep To Dream by EarFilms

EarFilms

April 7, 7:30pm; April 8 4:30pm and 7:30pm; April 9, 1:30pm and 4:30pm
Bing Concert Hall Studio
Tickets required

You’ve never done this at a concert hall before: blindfolded, you’re earwitness to a new theatrical sensation. To Sleep to Dream is an EarFilm, an immersive audioplay with narration, acting, and music within a three-dimensional listening environment customized for the Bing Studio. The plot: it’s the future, and a totalitarian government outlaws dreaming. A rebel fights back. Join him. Take a break from screen time. Dare to dream again!

This even is co-sponsored by Stanford Live


The W. Kamau Bell Curve: Ending Racism In About An Hour

W. Kamau Bell
United Shades of America

February 17, 2017, 8pm
Cemex Auditorium
Ticket reservations are sold out.

If you have a ticket:
Doors will open for Stanford University ID holders at 7:15 pm. Doors will open for the public at 7:30 pm. Please arrive at least 10 minutes before the event starts. Your ticket may be released to the standby line if you do not arrive by 7:50 pm.

If you don’t have a ticket:
We set aside some additional seats, which will be available right before the event starts on a first-come first-served basis. There will be a separate standby line for SUID holders – who will receive extra seats first – then the public – who will receive any remaining seats.

W. Kamau Bell is a critically acclaimed sociopolitical comedian. Host of the Emmy Award nominated, hit CNN docu-series United Shades of America. Host of the public radio show Kamau Right Now! on KALW in San Francisco. Co-host of two podcasts: Denzel Washington is The Greatest Actor of All Time Period and Politically Re-Active. The New York Times called Kamau “the most promising new talent in political comedy in many years.”

This event is co-sponsored by ITALIC. 


Winter Workshops: Valentine’s Day

Winter Workshops flyer

February 14, 2017
7pm
Roble Arts Gym

Join the Stanford Storytelling Project this Valentine’s Day for a workshop on telling your most hilarious and cringeworthy love stories!

Bring a date, bring a friend, or bring yourself! Any which way, there will be chocolate and desserts! 


The Beautiful Art of Failure with Anthony Doerr

Anthony Doerr
All the Light We Cannot See

February 7, 2017, 7:30pm
Cemex Auditorium
Ticket reservations are sold out.

If you have a ticket:
Doors will open for Stanford University ID holders at 7:00 pm. Doors will open for the public at 7:10 pm. Please arrive at least 10 minutes before the event starts. Your ticket may be released to the standby line if you do not arrive by 7:20 pm.

If you don’t have a ticket:
We set aside some additional seats, which will be available right before the event starts on a first-come first-served basis. There will be a separate standby line for SUID holders – who will receive extra seats first – then the public – who will receive any remaining seats.

Anthony Doerr was born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio. He is the author of the story collections The Shell Collector and Memory Wall, the memoir Four Seasons in Rome, and the novels About Grace and All the Light We Cannot See, which was awarded the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for fiction and the 2015 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction.


Inheritance

In this episode, we explore inheritances’ many forms and unexpected outcomes. “You’ll hear the forgotten tales of hand-me down clothing, stories of family exploits that keep ancestors alive, how your genetic inheritance can define you…for better and for worse, and how even our values can get passed down from one generation to the next.”

 

Host: Rosie La Puma
Producers: Rosie La Puma, Luke Soon-Shiong, Hadley Reid, Jake Warga, Claudia Heymach, Christy Hartman, Annina Hanlon, Benjamin Philip Suliteanu, Jonah Willihnganz, Ethan Chua
Featuring: Rosie La Puma, Deborah Wicks-La Puma, Deanna Wicks, Luke Soon-Shiong, Brooke McEver, Claudia Heymach, Marisa Heymach, Sierra Freeman, Matthew Porteus, Devon Cajuste, Amalia Saladrigas, McGregor Joyner, Emma Rothenberg
Show music: Proliferate by Podington Bear

Image courtesy of Rosie La Puma

Release Date: 1 February 2017


 

Intro Story: Alice

“For my mom and myself, taking care of Alice means taking care of a part of my grandmother, and her mother, and her mother before her.” She’s over a century old, but still the size of a toddler. Meet Alice, the inherited family member that has been handed down for five generations of daughters.

Producer: Rosie La Puma
Featuring: Rosie La Puma, Deborah Wicks-La Puma, and Deanna Wicks
Music: Proliferate by Podington Bear

Image courtesy of Rosie La Puma

 

Story 1: The Stories We Wear

Brooke McEver, an MFA student at Stanford sets up a free store where people donate clothing along with a handwritten tag that explains the story behind the clothing. When someone takes that clothing, they respond to the story on the other side of the tag. We explore what this means for understanding inheritance as a choice.

Producers: Luke Soon-Shiong with help from Hadley Reid and Jake Warga
Featuring: Luke Soon-Shiong, Brooke McEver
Music: Bensound.com

Image courtesy of Brooke McEver

 

Story 2: Abuelita

Twenty years ago, Claudia’s mom created a book of family history based on interviews she taped with Claudia’s late great-grandmother. Claudia listens to the tapes for the first time and explores what it means to collect family history and receive it.

Producer: Claudia Heymach
Featuring: Claudia Heymach, Marisa Heymach, Rosie La Puma
Special thanks: Kate Nelson
Music and Sound: Afterglow by Podington Bear, gunfight sound effect from Freesound

Image courtesy of Marisa Heymach

 

Story 3: We’re All Okay

A young woman comes to terms with a potentially lethal condition that runs in her family. “‘Is he okay, is he going to be okay, is the surgery going okay?’ Maybe they were just tired of the same sentence, rearranged. We want to know, is he going to be …”

Writer: Sierra Freeman
Producers: Claudia Heymach, Christy Hartman, and Rosie La Puma
Featuring: Sierra Freeman
Music: Jackson Roach on mandolin

Image via Flickr

 

Story 4: CRISPR-Cas9

A Stanford Lab develops gene editing tools to fight disease, and in the process challenges whether our destiny is predetermined by DNA.

Producers: Claudia Heymach with help from Annina Hanlon and Rosie La Puma
Featuring: Claudia Heymach and Matthew Porteus
Music: Dark Waters by Podington Bear

Image via Wikimedia

 

Story 5: Father to Son

Live from StoryNight 2015, Devon Cajuste tells the story of how his father told him that he has five years left to live. “You don’t know what to do when you’re thirteen years old and your dad tells you that he has five years left to live … and I count and that’s my freshman year of college.”

Producer: Rosie La Puma
Featuring: Devon Cajuste

Image courtesy of StoryNight

 

Story 6: Call Me by My Old Familiar Name

Non-narrated story of three Stanford students who share something in common: they lost their fathers. “You can be angry about death for a very long time but it’s not really worth. I think death just makes you look at life in the face. Even when he was sick, he was still very much trying to live his life …”

Producer: Benjamin Philip Suliteanu
Featuring: Amalia Saladrigas, McGregor Joyner, Emma Rothenberg
Music: Original song by McGregor Joyner

Image via Flickr